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Posted By Topic: Installing UK 3 pin sockets in NZ house

Matt Dorn
Aug 19 2013 09:56

Will I get an electrical certificate on a new build in NZ if I install UK 3 pin socket outlets.
   

Hedley
Aug 19 2013 10:58

Nope. I don't believe that you could get an SDOC from any NZ supplier for these items and therefore they are not legal to supply or install in NZ.

But I could be wrong. Time will tell.
   

AlecK
Aug 19 2013 11:25

Wiring Rules clause 4.4.1
   

pluto
Aug 19 2013 13:59

The correct reference to use is ESR 61A and effectively excludes all other types in NZ.

61A Rule about 3-pin flat-pin socket-outlets in low voltage
installations
(1) If a 3-pin flat-pin socket-outlet that has the dimensions specified
in AS/NZS 3112 is, or is to be, installed in a low voltage
installation, it must be installed in such a way that—
(a) the socket-outlet may be supplied with electricity only
at standard low voltage; and
(b) the earth-continuity conductor is connected to the slot
on the radial line; and
(c) the order of connection, in a clockwise direction when
the socket-outlet is viewed from the front, is—
(i) earth-continuity conductor:
(ii) active conductor:
(iii) neutral (or other) conductor.
(2) This regulation applies despite anything in Part 1 or Part 2 of
AS/NZS 3000 or in these regulations.
   

Andrew
Aug 19 2013 15:42

ESR61A applies to AS/NZS 3112 plugs and sockets, not UK (BS 1363) ones (or AS/NZS 3123 plugs that are perfectly legal to install). The wiring rules reference is the one that prevents installation of UK socket outlets.

   

Warren Harris
Aug 19 2013 15:42

@ Pluto - your reference states that IF a 3112 type is to me used... etc how it is to be wired.

AlecK's reference states that (in accordance with AS/NZS3000 Part 2) 3112 (or 3 alternatives) must be used.

You could always go for a Part 1 solution, if you comply with ESR 59.
   

pluto
Aug 19 2013 17:31

Warren Harris Aug 19 2013 15:42

Your comment (Part)
You could always go for a Part 1 solution, if you comply with ESR 59.

My comment
ESR 59 (1) does NOT permit a Part 1 solution in a domestic house under 80 amps single phase or 50 amps per phase if multiphase and that will cover nearly all domestic houses.
   

The Don
Aug 19 2013 20:48

Aleck's reference is the correct one , The wiring rules 4.4.1 details which type of socket outlets maybe used in NZ.
Andrew is also correct reg 61a simply outlines the requirements for connection of sockets meeting the AS/NZS 3112 standard , nothing at all in that reg prevents you from using any of the types listed in the wiring rules .

That said UK sockets are not included in the allowed types so end of the Day , No you can't use them .

   

Socket 2me
Aug 19 2013 21:22

I wonder how many migrants from the UK are still using 13A multi extension boards / plugs on their PC's and other electronic gadgets..trusting the 13A plug tops with appropriate fuses in them, rather than rely on poxy 10A outlets from China protected by a 16A or 20A device on the sw/bd.
Don't think I'll be buying $200.00 worth of new plugs for my kit!
   

the usual
Aug 19 2013 22:44

@Socket 2me safer by far mate..
   

Warren Harris
Aug 20 2013 08:28

@ Pluto - correct - that's why I said IF complies with ESR59 in my statement. You could always get a larger supply to the house - eg 100A single phase or 63A polyphase, then comply with all the other stuff required for a Part 1 solution (Certified Design, Inspection etc etc).

My point is - it's not an absolute no, you would need to go to a lot of effort to make it happen.
   

David Buckley
Aug 21 2013 14:58

Time was PDL had the UK 13A socket available here as part number 1561 (single) and 1562 (double).

For some strange reason, pack 'n save Moorhouse Ave in Chch has (had? not been there for a long while) a 13A socket in the deli...


   

ShaneE
Aug 21 2013 20:24

All the woolworths super market used to have their UPS supplied sockets at the tills on UK plugs to make sure only certain equipment could be plugged in to it. It may not be legit by the book but they look like a pretty over engineered socket to me.... i'd be more worried about the poxy looking european sockets. but the rules are the rules etc etc
   

AlecK
Aug 22 2013 10:20

for a long time we had a regime of "must be safe... and will be deemed safe if comply with xyz.

Which guided us towards xyz - eg Wiring Rules - but didn't make them mnandatory.

which allowed lateral thinking for special applications.
Unfortunately too many took it beyond special applications, and just ignored the guidance on grounds it wasn't mandatory.

So from 2010 we've had "must be safe ... AND ... MUST comply with xyz".

So those MK plugs at Woolworths may comply with rules of the time, but it can't be done that way now unless as a Part 1 solution i.a.w a certified design.
   

Steve
Aug 25 2013 07:25

Yep, see a few of the PDL orange 13amp plug and sockets around in "control applications" in factorys, done so the floor rats can't plug anything into the circuit other than the intended item.
   

pluto
Aug 25 2013 09:15

Don't forget thee is a 3 pin flat pin socket outlet which complies with AS/NZS 3112 which has a round earth pin which can be used for special applications and this prevents the general use of the socket outlet.

They are ideal for socket outlets for UPS supplies, and standby power supply outlets, etc. when only a limited supply capacity is available.
   

ShaneE
Aug 25 2013 20:12

Funny you should say that... the reason i mentioned woolworths was because my job was an upgrade including changing pom sockets to round pins... The checkout chick could still charge her iphone in it though
   

David Buckley
Aug 26 2013 08:39

Alec notes:

for a long time we had a regime of "must be safe... and will be deemed safe if comply with xyz. Which guided us towards xyz - eg Wiring Rules - but didn't make them mnandatory. Which allowed lateral thinking for special applications.

Unfortunately too many took it beyond special applications, and just ignored the guidance on grounds it wasn't mandatory. So from 2010 we've had "must be safe ... AND ... MUST comply with xyz".

-------

And that thinking is how we will end up with the equivalent of the American NEC, which runs to over a thousand pages.

Find two American electricians around the water cooler, they don't discuss the kind of "how to" questions that get raised on this site, the only question they ask is which articles apply for this job.


   

Daniel
Aug 26 2013 21:07

I don't know what's the point of installing UK socket outlets when it's just as easy to lop the end off the appliance cord and put a normal male top plug on the end of it.
   

mf51to1
Apr 21 2018 08:29

Some uk appliances may draw over 10A up to 13A so fitting a 10A plug could be electrically unsafe.
   

dbuckley
Apr 22 2018 13:56

You are aware you are replying to a threat that has been dead for five years.....