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Posted By Topic: Sdoc

ryana
Dec 19 2017 13:47

I had a interior designer get a light fitting and want me to install but it did not have a sdoc . 2 weeks later now she has apparently had it rewired , and it has a ESC tag on it , but it is still not a sdoc ?? What should I do ? Thanks
   

AlecK
Dec 19 2017 14:08

SDoCs are all about controlling the sale & supply of fittings. They are required before fittings that have been Gazetted as declared medium risk articles(DMRAs)may be sold, supplied, or offered for sale or supply [ESR 83].

As an installer there is no requirement for any of the fittings you connect to have an SDoC, even if they are DMRAs.
ESR 83(3A) allows you to rely on an SDoC, if there is one, when issuing a CoC. But nothing requires an SDoC to exist before you connect it. All that's required is that you must be satisifed as to the fitting's safety. This is the same for EVERY fitting we install, it doesn't change between DMRAs and other fittings.

I take it that this newly-issued "ESC" is not an electrical safety certificate as described in ESR74A and for issue after something has been connected to supply; but instead a simple tag similar to those used for in-service testing to declare that an appliance is safe to use (and probably issued by EWRB)? If so it's essentially meaningless for you as an installer. You can't "rely" on it the way you can with an SDoC, so you have to make your own call as to whether the fitting is safe to connect. It certainly doesn't get the original seller / supplier off the hook for selling supplying a DMRA in breach of ESRs.
And of course any changes to the way it is assembled or wired will have invalidated the original SDoC (if one ever existed).

   

mf51to1
Dec 19 2017 22:31

What is the light model? An sDoc may exist online. I think lighting direct (for example) have all their sDoc copies on their website.
   

Andrew
Dec 20 2017 11:30

Whether an SDoC exists online for the original fitting only matters to the installer if there has been no material change to it. The fact that it's been rewired suggests this is not the case.
   

EricB
Dec 20 2017 19:50

Hi

I have been having an issue with a customer who imported water elements from the USA. They didn't have any way to earth them individually. I always thought hot water elements and the likes of, should be. Only those fitted at the factory (in NZ) of manufacture don't have to?
My customer had a NZ company look at them and add an earth tag. Their Certificate is as below.

TEST STANDARD - AS/NZS 3760-2010, AS/NZS 3100.
HEATING ELEMENT REF: DS1333BL, 230 V, 4800 W, Ø8 MM TUBULAR ELEMENT ON A 1.0” BSP BRASS BOSS, 250 MM LEADS, SPADE EARTH TERMINAL, AS PER PHOTOS SUPPLIED.
APPLICATION: TO HEAT WATER
TEST: 1500 V AC: PASS /500 V DC: PASS/ RESISTANCE: 11.02 OHMS +/- 7%: PASS.

I asked originally for a sDOC. This Certificate above is not one, from my point of view. Am I correct?
Further more am I correct in saying each of the 4 elements that are to be fitted into this large water heater need to be earthed individually? I feel very uncomfortable with the situation. The customer wants me to quote every part of the Regs and Act. This is to "educate him".
Appreciate any advice.

Thanks. Eric B
PS. His method of protection to insulate them from direct contact is to fill the area with Silicone. Naturally I won't follow this idea.

   

AlecK
Dec 20 2017 22:56

You're correct that the cert you quote is not an SDoC, which must be on the form prescribed by ES.

But, repeat ad nauseum: SDoCs are ONLY required for DMRAs, NOT for absolutely everything . An element isn't a DMRA. An "immersion heater" is, and so is a "liquid heating appliance" but as for all DMRAs on the list these generic categories come with particular definitions - and anything else isn't covered



And where did you find a specific requirement for an element to be directly earthed? Not that it isn't good practice, but it's "exposed conductive parts" [ 5.3.1] that need to be earthed, and in most w/h situations the element is not accessible.