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Posted By Topic: Rewirable plug anchors

shuffleboy
Feb 16 2019 18:40

Hi all. I have recently been testing and tagging our office and warehouse. I found a few things I would like confirmation on.

Firstly, I found 2 industrial machines with see-through plugs. I notice inside them that the anchoring is not securing the flexible cord correctly, but is holding down the primary conductor insulation as opposed to the the thicker black supplementary insulation . I failed these on this fact, but have been questioned if this was necessary. What do you think?

Also, there is a power adaptor which charges a large floor scrubbing machine. The adaptor shows now symbol for being double insulated, and the adaptor itself has metal casing. However, the IEC lead has a moulded 3 pin plug and 3 pins for inserting into the adapter, but the cable is only 2 core! The adaptor itself has 3 pins where the cord set plugs in. I failed this as in my opinion it has to be class 2, and a 2 core cable provides no earth connection. I have been asked if this was necessary, as the adaptor came with this 2 core/3 pin cable.

Any thoughts folks?
   

shuffleboy
Feb 16 2019 18:42

A few predictive messaging errors in that.

Now should be "no"

Class 2 should be " class 1"

Apologies
   

DougP
Feb 16 2019 18:56

For the plugs, are you talking about non-original Clipsal see through plugs? They do come with a clamping ring for the flex entry, but a lot of flex is too small for it to clamp on to. Usually if I'm fitting those plugs, I use self amalgamating tape to increase the size so it clamps correctly. But the use of tape isn't allowed for T&T either...

For the power adaptor, if it doesn't have a double insulated symbol, then presumably it is class I, so should have a lead with an earth. Did you test if the earth on the IEC is connected to the case?

Possibly it has the wrong lead supplied and no one has tested it correctly before. It's like $5 for the correct lead so it's an easy fix.
   

shuffleboy
Feb 16 2019 19:11

Cheers for the reply.

I think they are replacing the lead, it just seemed odd to be supplied a 2 core. I will ask who the supplier was.

Also I will check the manufacturer of the see through plug on Monday, and upload a photo for you to see.

Cheers again!
   

SteveH
Feb 17 2019 09:09

" Usually if I'm fitting those plugs, I use self amalgamating tape to increase the size so it clamps correctly. But the use of tape isn't allowed for T&T either."

That would only be a problem on the external part of the flex Doug, I use a short length of glue lines Heat Shrink tube to do the same thing. The thing that a lot of folk get wrong with the Clipsal 439 plug, is failing to lead each conductor round the base below each termination point,

I think the plugs that OP is talking about are most likely PDL 56 series, which have a clamp for external sheath.

"However, the IEC lead has a moulded 3 pin plug and 3 pins for inserting into the adapter, but the cable is only 2 core! The adaptor itself has 3 pins where the cord set plugs in"
You have almost got it right, AS/NZS-3760 requires that items with a detachable lead, first have the lead tested and tagged (this one fails) and then we connect the appliance and test it appropriately.

In this case the maker has identified it as a Class 2 item, so it isn't earthed, he has fitted the wrong IEC appliance coupler, should have been a 2 pin one, the simple solution is fail the original lead, while it's not a safety issue with this appliance, if the lead gets swapped to a class 1 appliance, it makes that an unsafe situation- then get a three core IEC lead- this may be a little tricky because the charger for your scrubber may draw close to 10A. It's not an issue to have a three core lead supplying a class 2, the earth conductor in this situation isn't connected to the appliance

Does the socket connector (the part that plugs into the power supply have a grove in it? if not, then go to your IT guy and grab a replacement IEC lead (there will be a bunch somewhere at your work)

Well spotted, seen a few like this that careless taggers have passed.

SteveH
Port Appliance Test & Tag
   

SteveH
Feb 17 2019 09:19

We frequently find that someone is using an overseas IEC lead to supply a power supply through a travel adapter, fail it and again go to the IT cupboard and grab a replacement IEC lead of suitable configuration with an AUS/NZ plug top and it's good to go (do check to make sure that the appliance has the correct voltage rating for use in NZ.

It must have a Voltage rating of at least 230V, it may have a rating like 100V-240V, this is fine 230V is in that range. It might say it's rated to 240V, again that's fine. What it can't have is a voltage rating that's less than 230V.

SteveH
Port Appliance Test & Tag
   

Satobsat
Feb 17 2019 09:42

I have come across appliances and fittings before that are 220V which is 2 phase Chinese and American
   

SteveH
Feb 17 2019 09:53

Yes, lot come from Japan also.

Frequently see items connected via a Chinese domestic plug, these don't comply with 3112, so into the Failure pile also. Identified by lack of insulation on Active & Neutral pins and when plug is inserted into a socket outlet the lead exits from upward, rather than out or down to side.
   

shuffleboy
Feb 17 2019 14:42

Thank you all.

I will grab some photos of these items this week and post them up if the site allows. Or a link to a photo hosting site.

I appreciate and enjoy learning more from you.

To add now, the adaptor I removed from service until I could gain a better understanding. I did however, add a 3 core earthed iec lead to it, and managed and earth bond reading to the case of the adaptor. This surely means the the case is connected to earth, and thus an earthed lead must be fitted?

For the plugs, yes the outer black sheath is not connected to the anchors, just the primary Insulation strands. It looks to me like they can indeed be recut and rewired to grip this, so thus I failed them.

The catch is I'm the EAS at work, so just made myself some extra unpaid work.

I found many extension leads with shrouds cut to fit side-entry plugs. Also many items with loose cord anchors/connection points, and a whole barrel load of items with bent pins. The company I work for intend to be proactive in maintaining electrical safety, and I'm the one tasked with bringing it up to standard to move forward with.

Photos to follow soon
   

SteveH
Feb 17 2019 18:30

"To add now, the adaptor I removed from service until I could gain a better understanding. I did however, add a 3 core earthed iec lead to it, and managed and earth bond reading to the case of the adaptor. This surely means the the case is connected to earth, and thus an earthed lead must be fitted?"

It's certainly possible the manufacturer has got it wrong labeling the item as a Class 2, last week we saw an LED worklight with a couple of standard 10A outlets on it's back the the maker proudly labeled as a Double Insulated item, which could confuse someone TnT'ing without a grasp on what to expect.

Equally, it could be that all live components have two layers of insulation, and it has been constructed as a Class 2 item.

What approval markings does it have, and where was it made?

SteveH
Port Appliance Test & Tag
   

shuffleboy
Feb 17 2019 18:37

Thanks Steve. I'll get more info on it tomorrow and take a few snaps.

As above I had to correct my original post due to predictive messaging error (fat fingers), as the adaptor has NO class 2 markings.
   

SteveH
Feb 17 2019 21:38

As above I had to correct my original post due to predictive messaging error (fat fingers), as the adaptor has NO class 2 markings.

Ok, so yes you have to treat it as Class I, it has external earthed metal and should have been connected via a standard 3 Core IEC lead, but only the lead fails (assuming item has rating plate and it complies (less than 10A and 230V)

SteveH
Port Appliance Test & Tag
   

shuffleboy
Feb 20 2019 13:53

Here's a pic of one of the plugs
   

shuffleboy
Feb 20 2019 13:55

So does the plug need to be secured on the outer sheath via the anchor? It feels very easy to pull out to me.

Also, I sincerely apologise. The adaptor I mentioned earlier idoes indeed have a class 2 marking on it. I missed that, and feel embarrassed.
   

DougP
Feb 20 2019 14:33

Yes it should be clamped over the outer sheath.
   

Satobsat
Feb 20 2019 14:34

These plugs generally have a small rectangular piece of plastic attached inside that you can put in a slot under the cable clamp so that the clamp will grip smaller diameter flexes. Yes the clamp should be on the outer sheath.
   

Satobsat
Feb 20 2019 14:38

As an EAS you should know this, if you are registered and licenced that is.
   

shuffleboy
Feb 20 2019 15:10

This was found as part of my PAT testing, and appropriately removed from service.

I am licenced. This plug was installed onto this by a registered electrician, who has since left the country. As luck would have it, I have not rewired this exact model of plug before. Thus I am just asking the forum, in case there was some crazy reason why the electrician only secured by the primary Insulation
   

DougP
Feb 20 2019 15:15

Are you sure it didn't just pull out? Maybe not the Electricians fault.
   

shuffleboy
Feb 20 2019 15:28

That is a realistic possibility too.

Hopefully you all don't mind answering my questions. Happy to donate to the forum again, am a regular reader.

I shall fix the plug.



   

shuffleboy
Feb 20 2019 15:41

As a final question, for another plug that has a similar issue:

Can anyone point me to the law/standard that would state that when repairing a plug/appliance that has non-insulated pins, that a plug with insulated pins must be fitted to it as part of the repair.

I read 3112, 5762,esr etc but cannot find anything that points to this being required.
   

SteveH
Feb 20 2019 21:28

"Can anyone point me to the law/standard that would state that when repairing a plug/appliance that has non-insulated pins, that a plug with insulated pins must be fitted to it as part of the repair."

Why do you think that's required? assuming that item is electrically safe,it's not required here. The Western Islands of NZ specify that an item with non insulated pins can't be sold or hired, and new plugs made to comply with versions of AS/NZS 3112 after 2000 will have insulated pins.

SteveH
Port Appliance Test & Tag

http://www.commerce.wa.gov.au/sites/default/files/atoms/files/insulated_pins_on_plug_tops_0.pdf
   

shuffleboy
Feb 21 2019 15:47

Finally got time to fix these plugs.

The phase and neutral were on the wrong pins!
   

DougP
Feb 21 2019 20:06

Someone should have spotted that in your photo..
   

SteveH
Feb 23 2019 08:38

Does an appliance fitted with a cordset that has a plug top with insulated pins, where one of the pins has this insulation damaged or missing fail a test & tag check?

Yes, AS/NZS 3760 is a Safety Inspection And Testing Of Electrical Equipment check.

Why? Clause 2.3.2 (F) Check that covers, guards and the like are secured and working in the manner intended by the manufacturer or supplier.

So just as any other guards, safety interlocks, must be present, unmodified etc, so must the insulation on plug pins, and the safety skirt on a socket connector for an item to pass.
   

Someone
Feb 23 2019 17:04

2.3.2 (h) states it even more clearly as it actually says "The pins of insulated pin plugs should be inspected for damage to the insulation of the
pins..."

The fact that it specifically refers to 'insulated pin plugs' makes it reasonably obvious that, if the plug was not manufactured with insulated pins, this part of 3760 does not require them to be added.
   

SteveH
Feb 24 2019 11:51

"The fact that it specifically refers to 'insulated pin plugs' makes it reasonably obvious that, if the plug was not manufactured with insulated pins, this part of 3760 does not require them to be added."

Yes, true that SO. The whole of 2.3.2 is devoted to what must be inspected, (h) also mentions socket connector shrouds, if fitted should be checked for damage.

The final clause of 2.3.2 (i)check that the current rating of an IUT is consistent with the current rating of the device (reinforced by E(S)R 23.g- which is a legal requirement that is frequently overlooked or ignored)

Quite a bit to test & tag if performed correctly to AS/NZS 3760, and 3012 for items used on a C&D site.

SteveH
Port Appliance Test & Tag